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Work in ALEKS during Week 2 to complete the topics in the second three pie slices: " Geometry, Measurements, & Data Analysis," "Real Numbers ", and " Linear Equations & Inequalities" -Click "I have completed this activity" when you have completed your learning goals for Week 2 in ALEKS.

2.0 ALEKS Module 2 Assignment in WEEK 2 RIGHT GRADE META CHRONO REFERENCE

  • 12
SEP

  • 
 Overview

  LEARNING OUTCOMES 

  • To be able to perform the fundamental operations of mathematic with a higher degree of accuracy.

For this assignment we will check your progress over THREE main topic areas: ” Geometry, Measurements, & Data Analysis”,  ” Real Numbers “, and ” Linear Equations & Inequalities”. These topics are covered in the second three slices in ALEKS. We call these slices Module 2. ***You will receive random knowledge checks throughout the Module to help you focus on the topics in which you need more practice. Please be aware these knowledge checks can result is topics being given or taken away based on the results of each knowledge check. Try your best with each. ALEKS will not allow you to continue until you have completed the assessment **To determine your score for Module 2 you can divide the total number of topics you master from these three slices by the total number of topics in your pie for these three slices (105 Topics) and then convert this decimal to a percent. Your grade for this module will be the composite of all items completed in Module 2 of ALEKS. To Do: -Work in ALEKS during Week 2 to complete the topics in the second three pie slices: ” Geometry, Measurements, & Data Analysis,”  “Real Numbers “, and ” Linear Equations & Inequalities” -Click “I have completed this activity” when you have completed your learning goals for Week 2 in ALEKS.

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Next, write a summary in outline form of what you discovered during the exercise. This will begin to constitute the body of your proposal. Use the sections of a Research Proposal that you read about in this module to form an outline. This begins to set the structure and tone of your research proposal. Each week, you will be able to add and refine the sections that you are creating now. Describe the variables that you expect to use in your research proposal. (Note: These may change, but you should have some idea of what you want to measure or find out now.)

BUS 499: Module 2 Homework Assignment   Directions: Throughout this course, you will be working on your senior capstone project.  You will submit a component for this project at the end of each module.   Submit the following:  

  1. Complete Exercise 1 located in the textbook on page 109.  Note that some of the sections may not apply to your study.  You will use this as the basis of your homework assignment.  (You may scan this to your instructor, but it is not required.  However, it will help the instructor identify possible problems or areas that need help.)

 

  1. Next, write a summary in outline form of what you discovered during the exercise. This will begin to constitute the body of your proposal.  Use the sections of a Research Proposal that you read about in this module to form an outline.  This begins to set the structure and tone of your research proposal.  Each week, you will be able to add and refine the sections that you are creating now.

 

  1. Describe the variables that you expect to use in your research proposal.  (Note: These may change, but you should have some idea of what you want to measure or find out now.)

 

  1. Add the References that you identified in Module 1 and in the Module 2 Check Your Understanding.

 

  1. For help with APA guidelines, see: American Psychological Association. Basics of APA Style.  (http://www.apastyle.org/)

 

BUS 499: Module 1, 2, 3, and 4 Homework Assignments

  Directions: Please fill in the areas shaded in blue.  

Exercise I: Developing a research instrument (pp. 109-117)

  QUANTITATIVE STUDIES   Now that you have gone through all the chapters that constitute Step I of the research process, this exercise provides you with an opportunity to apply that knowledge to formulate a research problem that is of interest to you.  As you know, selecting a research problem is one of the most important aspects of social research, so this exercise will, therefore, help you in formulating your research problem by raising questions and issues that will guide you to examine critically various facets and implications of what you are proposing to study.  The exercise is designed to provide a directional framework that guides you through the problem formulation path.  Keep in mind that the questions and issues raised in this exercise are not prescriptive but indicative and directional; hence you need to be critical and innovative while working through them.  Thinking through a research problem with care can prevent a tremendous wastage of human and financial resources.   A research problem should be clearly stated and be specific in nature.  The feasibility of the study in terms of the availability of technical expertise, finances, and time, and in terms of its relevance, should be considered thoroughly at the problem-formulation stage.  In studies that attempt to establish a causal relationship or an association, the accuracy of the measurement of independent (cause) and dependent (effect) variables is of crucial importance and, hence, should be given serious consideration.  If you have already selected a problem, you need not go through this process.   Start by identifying a broad area you are interested in.  For example, a health, education or treatment programme; migration; patient care; community health; community needs; foster care; or the relationship between unemployment and street crime.  Chapter 4 of this book will help you to work through this exercise.   Step I:  Select a broad area of study that interests you from within your academic discipline.   Having selected an area, the next step is to ‘dissect’ it in order to identify its various aspects and subareas.  For example, say your broad area of interest is migration.  Some aspects or subareas of migration are:  

  • a socioeconomic–demographic profile of immigrants;
  • reasons for immigration;
  • problems of immigrants;
  • services provided to immigrants;
  • attitudes of immigrants towards migration;
  • attitudes of host communities towards immigrants;
  • the extent of acculturation and assimilation;
  • racial discrimination in the host country.

  Or perhaps you are interested in studying a public health programme.  Dissect it as finely as possible in order to identify the aspects that could be studied.  List them as they come to you.  For example:  

  • a socioeconomic–demographic profile of the target group;
  • the morbidity and mortality patterns in a community;
  • the extent and nature of programme utilization;
  • the effects of a programme on a community;
  • the effectiveness of a particular health promotion strategy.

  Or your interest may be in studying delinquents.  Some aspects of delinquency are:  

  • delinquency as related to unemployment, broken homes or urbanization;
  • a profile of delinquents;
  • reasons for delinquency;
  • various therapeutic strategies.

  Step II:  “Dissect” the broad area that you selected in Step I into subareas as discretely and finely as possible.  Have a one-person (with yourself) brainstorming session.     To investigate all these subareas is neither advisable nor feasible.  Select only those subareas that would be possible for you to study within the constraints of time, finance, and expertise at your disposal.  One way to select your subarea is to start with a process of elimination: delete those areas you are not very interested in.  Towards the end, it may become difficult, but you need to keep eliminating until you have selected a subarea(s) that can be managed within your constraints.  Even one subarea can provide you with a valid and exhaustive study.   Step III:  From the above subareas, select a subarea or subareas in which you would like to conduct your study.     Step IV:  Within each chosen subarea, what research questions do you hope to answer?  (Be as specific as possible.  You can select one or as many subareas as you want.)  

Subarea Specific research questions to be answered
1a 1.
2.
3.
1b 1.
2.

 

  1. (a)

(b) (c) (d) (e)

  1. (a)

(b) (c) (d) (e)

  1. (a)

(b) (c) (d) (e)   The research questions to be answered through the study become the basis of your objectives.  Use action-oriented words in the formulation of objectives.  The main difference between research questions and objectives is the way they are written.  Questions are worded in question form and objectives are statements referring to the achievement of a task.   Your main objective should indicate the overall focus of your study and the subobjectives and its specific aspects.  Subobjectives should be listed numerically.  They should be worded clearly and unambiguously.  Make sure each objective contains only one aspect of the study.   Step V:  On the basis of your research questions, formulate the main objective and the subobjectives of your study.   Main objective (the main focus of your study):     Subobjectives (specific aspects of your study):       Step VI:  Carefully consider the following aspects of your study.  

Task What is involved Time needed Approx. Time needed Approx. cost Technical expertise needed Gaps in knowledge and skills
Literature review          
Literature review construction          
Data collection          
Data analysis          
Draft report          
Final report          

  Now you have developed the objectives of your study.  Take some time to think about them.  Be clear about what tasks are involved, what time is realistically required, and what skills you need to develop in order to conduct your study.  Consider these areas carefully again.   Step VII:  Double-check:   Are you really interested in the study? Yes    No    Uncertain     Do you agree with the objectives of the study? Yes    No    Uncertain     Are you certain you want to pursue the study? Yes    No    Uncertain     Do you have adequate resources? Yes    No    Uncertain     Do you have access to an appropriate study population? Yes    No    Uncertain     If your answer to any of these questions is either “no” or “uncertain,” re-examine the selected aspects carefully and make the appropriate changes in your objectives.   What, in your opinion, is the relevance of this study to theory and practice?  How will your study contribute to the existing body of knowledge, help the practitioners in your profession, and assist in program development and policy formulation?   Relevance to theory:     Relevance to practice:       Now that you have formulated your research problem it is important to examine your objective, research questions and hypotheses to identify if you have used any concepts in their formulation.  When you convert concepts into variables an understanding about variables plays a very important role.  Concepts are highly subjective as their understanding varies from person to person and, as such, they may not be measurable.  Any concept, perception or imagination that can be measured on any one of the four measurement scales (nominal, ordinal, internal or ratio) is called a variable.  It is important for concepts used in a study to be operationalized in measurable terms so that the extent of variation in a study population’s understanding of them is reduced, if not eliminated.   At this stage, when you have formulated your objectives, it is important for you to think how you will operationalize any concepts used in the objectives, research questions or hypotheses formulated: what are their indicators and how will they be measured?   The following table suggests how you might operationalize the concept of ‘effectiveness’, in relation to a health education programme on AIDS.  It lists the indicators of effectiveness (you can have other indicators) sets out the variables that measure the indicators and describes the unit of measurement for the variables.  

Concept Indicator Variable(s) Unit of measurement
Effectiveness Awareness of AIDS Extent of change in: Change in the proportion of the population, before and after the health education programme, with respect to:
  Knowledge about AIDS Awareness Knowledge Practice Awareness of, and knowledge about, different aspects of AIDS
  Use of contraceptives (practice)   Use of contraceptives for safe sex
This part of the exercise is designed to help you operationalize the major concepts used in your study.  Refer to Chapter 5 for additional information on variables.

  Step VIII:  Operationalize your concepts.  

Objectives/research questions/hypotheses Major concepts Indicators Variables Unit of measurement
         
       
       
         
       
       
         
       
       

  It is essential to develop a working or operational definition of your study population.  For example, who would you consider to be a patient, an immigrant, a youth, a psychologist, a teacher, a delinquent, or a Christian?  Working definitions play a crucial role in avoiding ambiguities in the selection of a sample and help you to narrow your study population.   Step IX:  Operationally define your study population.   As discussed, some believe that one must have a hypothesis to undertake an investigation; however, in the author’s opinion, hypotheses, although they bring clarity, specificity, and focus to a research problem, are not essential for a study.  You can conduct a valid investigation without constructing a single formal hypothesis.  On the other hand, you can construct as many hypotheses as you think appropriate.  In epidemiological studies, to narrow the field of investigation, one must construct a hypothesis as to the probable cause of the condition to be investigated.   A hypothesis is a hunch, assumption, suspicion, assertion, or idea about a phenomenon, relationship, or situation, which you intend to investigate in order to find out if you are right.  If it proves to be right, your assumption was correct; hence, you prove that your hypothesis was true.  Otherwise, you conclude your hypothesis to be false.   Disproving a hypothesis is as important as, or more important than, proving it.  As a hypothesis is usually constructed on the basis of what is commonly believed to be right, your disproving it might lead to something new that has been ignored by previous researchers.   A hypothesis should be conceptually simple, clear, and specific, and be capable of verification and being expressed operationally.   There is a specific way of writing a hypothesis, with which you need to be familiar (refer to Chapter 6).   Step X:  Construct your hypothesis or hypotheses for each subobjective/research question.  

Objectives/research questions Hypotheses to be tested
  1
2
3
  1
2
3
  1
2
3

    QUALITATIVE STUDIES   As mentioned earlier, the difference in qualitative and quantitative research studies starts with the way you think about and formulate your research problem.  In qualitative studies, the research problem is preferred to be broad, flexible, and continuously formulated as the information is collected.  In the process of data collection, if you find something interesting relating to your broad area of study, you add the aspect(s) and change the focus to accommodate the new vision.   This flexibility is an important strength of qualitative research, but it is also important that you develop a conceptual framework of issue and questions for your study, as non-specificity about what you want to find out can often create problems for your respondents.  Many do not feel comfortable or are not in a position to articulate the multiple aspects of an area without being prompted.  For situations like this, it is important that you are fully prepared with a framework in mind for your enquiry.  No doubt you can develop this framework during data collection, while talking to your respondents, but this may create a problem in terms of completeness and comparability with the information obtained during the early phase of the study.  You can minimize some of these problems by developing a conceptual framework in advance.  It is also important that you communicate with respondents in specific terms without bias or influencing their thinking.   Remember, these are not the questions that you will ask of your respondents.  These are just reminders for raising issues or questions if nothing much is forthcoming from a respondent.   In qualitative research the following would be considered as broad areas of interest:  

  • What does it mean to have a child with ADHD in the family?
  • How resilient is this community?
  • What is community responsiveness?
  • Living with HIV/AIDS.
  • How has a community coped after a major bush fire or tsunami?

  Step I:  Select a broad area of study that interests you or a question that you want to find answers to through the research study.   Step II:  Having selected your main research question or broad area of study, list all questions to which you want to find answers.  Also list all issues that you want to discuss with your respondents.  Your literature review, discussions with others, and consultation with potential respondents will be of immense help at this stage.   Questions:     Issues:   References

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Prepare inventory list. This can be done by using software or physically verifying the existing equipment. Your inventory list should include currently operable equipment and new equipment. (You can use inventory template of course module for guidelines) Prepare a high level existing drawing. This drawing should include all key components of your network. (Key components: Connecting devices, Security devices, wireless devices, VLANs, and subnets of network) . In real world, client’s drawing does not match the topology on the site. In this section designer update the client’s supplied network drawing

I have attached the case study. These are what need to be completed for my homework:  

  • High level drawing.
  • WAN links bandwidth in your group
  • Inventory and IP scheme
  • Scope of work
  • Wireless Network
  • VoIP Design

 

  1. The first task in network design or upgrading the network, is defining the scope of work. This scope of work is outlined in client’s Request for Proposal. This is your base line for developing the scope of work. Here you will start gathering information about client business goals and technical requirements. For business goals, interview upper management and for technical requirements, IT department will provide you the information. In real world this step is necessary to validate the information provided by the client’s RFP. In this project this part is missing. Either you can role play and interview each other to get the information or you can skip it. If you skip it your scope of work is client’s RFP. Please see below for an example scope of work.
  2. Prepare inventory list. This can be done by using software or physically verifying the existing equipment. Your inventory list should include currently operable equipment and new equipment. (You can use inventory template of course module for guidelines)
  3. Prepare a high level existing drawing. This drawing should include all key components of your network. (Key components: Connecting devices, Security devices, wireless devices, VLANs, and subnets of network) . In real world, client’s drawing does not match the topology on the site. In this section designer update the client’s supplied network drawing.
  4. Prepare an IP scheme of your network
  5. Calculate WAN links bandwidth for your voice network.
  6. Prepare wireless design
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The question is : Compare and contrast the two types of English colonies in the Chesapeake (Jamestown/Virginia, 1607+), and New England (Plymouth, 1620+, and Massachusetts Bay, 1629+). Write an essay just one page please. I need it at 9;00 am Pacific time.

The question is : Compare and contrast the two types of English colonies in the Chesapeake (Jamestown/Virginia, 1607+), and New England (Plymouth, 1620+, and Massachusetts Bay, 1629+). Write an essay just one page please. I need it at 9;00 am Pacific time.

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Analyze this social trend in an essay of about 500 words. Discuss how this trend will affect workers, companies, and institutions of higher education.

Written Assignment 7: Writing an Analytical Paper As the world of work becomes more complex, many workers need training to avoid losing their jobs or being passed over for promotion. Consequently, many who would not have considered college 20 or even 15 years ago are finding themselves back in school. As adults become students, employers, colleges, and workers are changing old notions about how to go about pursuing higher learning. Analyze this social trend in an essay of about 500 words. Discuss how this trend will affect workers, companies, and institutions of higher education. Review the online writing sites as needed.

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Identify the different components of TRICARE billing and different types of benefits available to active duty members, veterans, and their family members. Understand the history of workers’ compensation and distinguish between federal workers’ compensation and state workers’ compensation. Explain the importance of the Explanation of Benefits and Electronic Remittance Advice forms. Understand the reimbursement follow-up, explain the appeals process for reimbursement, and identify refund guidelines.

H07 Medical Coding I Directions:  Be sure to make an electronic copy of your answer before submitting it to Ashworth College for grading.  Unless otherwise stated, answer in complete sentences, and be sure to use correct English spelling and grammar.  Sources must be cited in APA format.  Your response should be two (2) to four (4) pages in length; refer to the “Assignment Format” page for specific format requirements.   Lessons 5, 6, 7, and 8 of this course have covered a wide variety of topics. Thus far, you have learned a great deal of information on TRICARE, Workers’ Compensation, Explanation of Benefits and Payment Adjudication, Refunds, Follow-Ups, and Appeals.   For this writing assignment, please explain why the following course objectives are important for medical billers and coder to understand:  

  1. Identify the different components of TRICARE billing and different types of benefits available to active duty members, veterans, and their family members.

 

  1. Understand the history of workers’ compensation and distinguish between federal workers’ compensation and state workers’ compensation.

 

  1. Explain the importance of the Explanation of Benefits and Electronic Remittance Advice forms.

 

  1. Understand the reimbursement follow-up, explain the appeals process for reimbursement, and identify refund guidelines.

    Please include at least 3 scholarly articles within your response. Overall response will be formatted according to APA style and the total assignment should be between 2-4 pages not including title page and reference page.

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Define the leader’s and manager’s approach (mindset) to solving the dilemma. Determine Para’s solution if he used the leader’s perspective and then if he used the manager’s perspective. Do you see a difference? If so what differences? If not, why not? Could the outcome be the same and still benefit the company?

Learning Activity #3 In his article, “What Leaders Really Do,” Kotter (2001) [] stated, ” Managers promote stability while leaders press for change, and only organizations that embrace both sides of the contradiction can thrive in turbulent times” (p. 3). In the fact pattern below Juan Para must make a decision about hiring June Davies.  Keeping Kotter’s ideas in mind complete the following tasks:- Define the leader’s and manager’s approach (mindset) to solving the dilemma. Determine Para’s solution if he used the leader’s perspective and then if he used the manager’s perspective. Do you see a difference? If so what differences? If not, why not? Could the outcome be the same and still benefit the company? Scenario: Protection Insurance Stays Alive At 7:30 a.m., Juan Para hit the snooze alarm for the third time, but he knew he could never go back to sleep.  Rubbing his eyes and shaking off a headache, Para first checked his iPhone and read an urgent message from his boss, explaining that Jack Nixon, chief security analyst, had resigned last night and needed to be replaced immediately.  Frustrated, Para lumbered toward the shower, hoping it would energize him to face another day.  After last night’s management meeting, which had ended after midnight, he was reeling from the news that his employer, Protection Insurance, was spiraling toward a financial meltdown. Para scratched his head and wondered, “How could one of the world’s largest insurance companies plummet from being the gold standard in the industry to one struggling for survival?”  At the end of 2007, Protection Insurance had $100 billion in annual revenues, 65 million customers, and 96,000 employees in 130 countries.  One year later and staggered by losses stemming from the credit crisis, Protection Insurance teetered on the brink of failure and was in need of emergency government assistance.  Protection Insurance had been a victim of the meltdown in the credit markets. The collapse of this respected financial institution sent shock waves throughout the world’s economy. Within Protection Insurance’s Manhattan office, Para and his coworkers felt growing pressure to respond to this crisis quickly and ethically.  But morale was sagging and decision making was stalled.  New projects were on hold, revenues weren’t coming in fast enough, and job cuts were imminent.  Finger-pointing and resignations of key managers had become commonplace.  Strong leadership was needed to guide employees to stay the course. Para knew his first priority was to replace Jack Nixon. When leaving the meeting last night, his boss had told him, “It’s critical that we keep key managers in place as we weather this storm.  If we lose any managers, be sure you replace them with ones who can handle the stress and can make tough and even unpopular decisions.” Working up a sweat as he rushed into his office, Para began sorting through the day’s priorities.  His first task would be to consider internal candidates to replace Nixon.  He pondered the characteristics required of a chief securities analyst and scribbled them on a notepad: experienced in security and regulatory issues; strong decision-making skills; high ethical standards; able to make job cuts; comfortable with slashing budgets; and respected for calm leadership.  Para immediately thought of June Davies, a senior analyst who had been vocal about her desire to move up and had recently shown steady leadership as the organization started to crumble. Davies had worked her way up through the organization, becoming a respected expert in her field.  She had developed a strong team of loyal employees and made training and job development a priority. She was likable, sensitive to her employees, and a consensus builder.  While many managers within Protection Insurance had made questionable business decisions, June had held herself to a high ethical standard and created a culture of integrity.  Davies was focused on the future—a go-getter who knew how to get results. With the future of the company at stake; however, Para wondered if Davies could handle the tough challenges ahead.  Although he valued her team-building skills, she could be soft when it came to holding employees accountable.  A large part of her motivation was to have people like her.  When she reported a shortfall in earnings in the last company meeting and came under fire, she became defensive and did not want to point fingers at employees who were to blame.  In fact, Para recalled another instance when Davies recoiled at the thought of firing an employee who had developed a pattern of poor attendance while caring for her sick husband.  She confessed a hesitation to confront poor performers and employees struggling to balance home and work life. Para stirred his morning coffee and wondered aloud, “Is June Davies capable of balancing kindness and toughness during a crisis?  Can I count on her to be decisive and focused on top- and bottom-line results? Is she too much of a people pleaser?  Will it impact her ability to lead successfully?”   Times New Roman 12 pt font Double spaced 1 page

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Describe at least two (2) types of bullying to which Amanda Todd was subjected. Identify at least three (3) consequences that Amanda Todd experienced as a result of being bullied, and discuss her attempts to deal with them. Recommend two (2) strategies that you believe Amanda’s parents, teachers, and authorities could have used in order to reduce episodes of bullying of Amanda and thus prevent Amanda’s suicide. Compare at least two (2) similarities and two (2) differences between the bullying cases that take place today with those cases that took place when you attended high school. Explain the key contributing factors that you believe led to bullying behaviors. Next, suggest at least three (3) ways in which prevention programs can reduce bullying cases overall.

Recent history illustrates that bullying is a growing problem among today’s youth in the United States.  Amanda Todd, for example, was only fifteen (15) years old when she committed suicide after being bullied by her peers for over a year.   Watch the video titled “Amanda Todd’s Story: Struggling, Bullying, Suicidal, Self-harm” (8 min 55 s). Video Source: ChisVideos. (2012, October 11). Amanda Todd’s Story: Struggling, Bullying, Suicidal,   Self-harm [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ej7afkypUsc.  This video can be viewed from within your online course shell.   Use your textbook, the Internet, and / or Strayer Library to research articles on bullying cases that occur today.   Write a two to three (2-3) page paper in which you:

  1. Describe at least two (2) types of bullying to which Amanda Todd was subjected.
  2. Identify at least three (3) consequences that Amanda Todd experienced as a result of being bullied, and discuss her attempts to deal with them.
  3. Recommend two (2) strategies that you believe Amanda’s parents, teachers, and authorities could have used in order to reduce episodes of bullying of Amanda and thus prevent Amanda’s suicide.
  4. Compare at least two (2) similarities and two (2) differences between the bullying cases that take place today with those cases that took place when you attended high school.
  5. Explain the key contributing factors that you believe led to bullying behaviors. Next, suggest at least three (3) ways in which prevention programs can reduce bullying cases overall.
  6. Use at least two (2) quality references. Note: Wikipedia and other Websites do not qualify as academic resources.

  Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:

  • Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.
  • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required assignment page length.

  The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

  • Explore the relationship of illicit drugs, gangs, and forms of delinquency.
  • Explicate the types of prevention programs that are likely to work with high-risk youngsters.
  • Use technology and information resources to research issues in juvenile delinquency and justice.
  • Write clearly and concisely about juvenile delinquency and justice using proper writing mechanics.
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What would you do if a loved one died? Do you have plans in place if you die? What type of memorial service would you like to see for yourself? By the end of this discussion, you will be able to: Describe bereavement and the phases of grieving, indicating factors that underlie individual variations in grief responses.

Bereaved individuals have many thoughts and feelings similar to those of terminally ill patients who are moving closer to death. In this discussion we will explore the concepts related to death, dying, and bereavement. As you create your discussion post, consider the following:

  • What would you do if a loved one died? Do you have plans in place if you die? What type of memorial service would you like to see for yourself?

By the end of this discussion, you will be able to:

  • Describe bereavement and the phases of grieving, indicating factors that underlie individual variations in grief responses.

Complete the following: First, visit the website www.memory-of.com, which presents thousands of Web tributes and memorials. Describe bereavement and the phases of grieving. What factors underlie individual variations in grief responses? What services are available to the bereaved? In what ways do friends and loved ones memorialize the deceased? What are some possible advantages of memorials (thought the Web or otherwise)? Be sure to include in your response information from the textbook or other psychology-specific sources.


  Initial Discussion Post We ask that your initial post should be at least 250 words and must substantively integrate the assigned readings from the module with proper APA style formatting. You may use additional sources and materials as long as they are relevant to the discussion and cited properly with APA style citations.

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